GSA is pleased to announce the recipients of the DeLill Nasser Award for Professional Development in Genetics for Fall 2020! Given twice a year to graduate students and postdoctoral researchers, DeLill Nasser Awards support attendance at meetings and laboratory courses. 

The award is named in honor of DeLill Nasser, a long-time GSA supporter and National Science Foundation Program Director in Eukaryotic Genetics. Nasser was regarded by some as the “patron saint of real genetics,” shaping the field through more than two decades of leadership. She was especially supportive of young scientists, people who were beginning their careers, and those trying to open new areas of genetic inquiry. For more about Nasser, please see the tribute from Scott Hawley, published in the August 2001 issue of GENETICS.

Chee Kiang Ewe

Chee Kiang Ewe

PhD candidate, University of California Santa Barbara

“I study the genetic basis of developmental robustness and plasticity during embryogenesis in C. elegans.”

Felipe Martelli

Felipe Martelli

Postdoc, Monash University

“I am modelling and seeking dietary treatments for inborn errors of amino acid metabolism using fruit flies.”

Molly Matty

Molly Matty

Postdoc, Salk Institute for Biological Studies

“I am interested in how non-pathogenic microbes (like bacteria in the gut microbiota) affect animal behavior.”

Daniel Lee

Daniel Lee

Postdoc Fellow, California Institute of Technology

“I investigate the genetic and neuronal mechanisms that regulate sleep and wakefulness.”

Madhumala Sadanandappa

Madhumala Sadanandappa

Postdoc, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

“Neuronal and molecular mechanisms that underlie behavioral immunity in Drosophila.”

Lengxob ‘Lenny’ Yong

Lengxob ‘Lenny’ Yong

Postdoc Researcher, University of Exeter

“My research aim to understand the evolutionary and genetic bases of phenotypic evolution, particularly animal color patterns.”

Angli Xue

Angli Xue

PhD student with thesis under external review, The University of Queensland; Garvan Institute of Medical Research

“I am interested in understanding the links between genomic variations and human complex diseases by applying existing computational approaches and/or developing novel statistical genetics methods for analysis of large-scale next generation sequencing data.” 

Rachel Waymack

Rachel Waymack

PhD candidate, University of California Irvine

“Investigating the role regulatory DNA plays in ensuring normal early development.”

Farida Yasmin

Farida Yasmin

Graduate Student, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

“I study wild soybean to understand the genetic basis of complex metabolic variation and their role in plant defense.”

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