GENETICS is pleased to announce three new editors for the Gene Expression section of the journal: Julie Claycomb, Joseph Bondy-Denomy, and Geraldine Seydoux.

Julie Claycomb

Julie Claycomb

Julie Claycomb holds a longstanding interest in gene regulatory mechanisms involved in germline development. She started her lab in the Dept. of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, in 2011. She performed her PhD at the Whitehead Institute/MIT with Dr. Terry Orr-Weaver and her postdoctoral training with Dr. Craig Mello at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Research in the Claycomb lab focuses on understanding how small RNA pathways regulate gene expression throughout development, small RNA mediated epigenetic inheritance, and small RNA-based intercellular communication, using C. elegans as a model system. Dr. Claycomb also served as the Assistant Graduate Coordinator (2014-2016) and Graduate Coordinator (2016-2020) in her home Department, where she enjoyed mentoring over 400 graduate students, developing new curricula, and spearheading professional development initiatives. Dr. Claycomb is a Canada Research Chair in Small RNA Biology.

Joe Bondy-Denomy

Joe Bondy-Denomy

Joe Bondy-Denomy is an Associate Professor at the University of California, San Francisco in the Dept. of Microbiology & Immunology. The Bondy-Denomy lab studies pathogenic microbes and their interactions with bacteriophages, focusing on bacterial immune systems and the phage counter-response. A current focus in the lab is the discovery and characterization of phage-encoded “anti-CRISPR” proteins, the development of Cas3 gene editing tools in microbes, and the discovery of new anti-phage defense systems.

Geraldine Seydoux

Geraldine Seydoux

Geraldine Seydoux is a Professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Her lab studies cell polarity and RNA regulation in the context of embryonic and germline development using the nematode C. elegans.

Her lab has characterized mechanisms of PAR protein polarization and the generation of protein gradients in the cytoplasm, and has identified global inhibition of mRNA transcription as an essential first step in the establishment of the embryonic germline. More recently, the Seydoux lab has been studying the role of intrinsically disordered proteins in the assembly and function of P granules, RNA granules in the germline.  

    Leave a comment