Interview with Mary Ellen Wiltrout, MITx Biology Digital Learning Scientist and Curriculum Development Specialist, highlights the importance of sharing career interests, maintaining connections, and acquiring specific skillsets for a successful career in science education. In the Decoding Life series, we talk to geneticists with diverse career paths, tracing the many directions possible after research training. This series is brought to you by the GSA Early Career Scientist Career Development Subcommittee. When did you know that you wanted to have a career in science education? I definitely knew when I was a TA [teaching assistant] during my senior year at Carnegie Mellon University. It...


Check out the September issue of G3! Table of Contents Genome Reports Whole Genome Sequence of the Heterozygous Clinical Isolate Candida krusei 81-B-5 Christina A. Cuomo, Terrance Shea, Bo Yang, Reeta Rao, Anja Forche G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics September 2017 7: 2883-2889; DOI: https://doi.org/10.1534/g3.117.043547 The Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genomes of the Facultatively Eusocial Orchid Bee Euglossa dilemma Philipp Brand, Nicholas Saleh, Hailin Pan, Cai Li, Karen M. Kapheim, Santiago R. Ramírez G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics September 2017 7: 2891-2898; DOI: https://doi.org/10.1534/g3.117.043687 Genome-Wide Analysis of the First Sequenced Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae Strain M1601 Shengli Chen, Huafang Hao, Ping Zhao, François Thiaucourt, Ying He,...


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For many of the roughly 300 million people around the world with rare diseases, the road to diagnosis can be long, painful, expensive, and disheartening. Around eighty percent of very infrequently seen undiagnosed diseases are estimated to have a genetic basis, but even with modern DNA sequencing techniques, the causes are often unclear. In these cases, clinicians and their basic scientist collaborators are increasingly turning to laboratory models like fruit flies and zebrafish to help diagnose disease—and gain clues about how to treat it. The teamwork between clinicians and model organism researchers goes both ways: clinicians can find candidate genes...


There’s no such thing as an obese plant. But that doesn’t mean plants can’t teach us something about fat. In the September issue of GENETICS, Ducos et al. show that a protein that controls fat accumulation in humans has a similar function in Arabidopsis. They also find that the human and plant proteins may be regulated in similar ways, indicating that the pathways controlling fat deposition have deep evolutionary conservation. In humans, the highly conserved gene WDTC1 has a well-established link with body fat content. It controls the number of fat cells present, and genetic variation in WDTC1 is associated...


We are proud to support three new symposia organized by student and postdoctoral members of the GSA! Check out the descriptions from the Spring 2017 awardees of GSA Career Development Symposia funding. This program empowers early career members to organize local events that enhance the professional development of their peers, including career skills symposia, workshops, and networking events.   Is there an unmet career development need in your local research community? We need your proposals for unique and valuable events! The next application deadline is January 10, 2018.  2018 Boston Postdoctoral Association Symposium on Careers and Collaboration in Science    Many graduate student and postdoctoral trainees have strong research,...