Image: photo focused on the feet of three people running by aquachara via Unsplash, Unsplash License.

Sexual reproduction is scarce in skin infection culprit. While some people love to feel the burn during a workout, we generally seek that sensation in our muscles—not our feet. Treading barefoot in damp, communal environments like gym showers and the perimeters of pools can expose us to the fungus Trichophyton rubrum, the most common cause of athlete’s foot. Despite its name, athlete’s foot isn’t found exclusively in fitness fanatics—it affects around 15% of people worldwide. New work published in GENETICS shows that across this global range, the T. rubrum genome varies surprisingly little. T. rubrum is widespread and comes in many...


We’re taking time over the following weeks to get to know the members of the GSA’s Early Career Scientist Committees. Join us every week to learn more about our early career scientist advocates.           Lacy Barton Policy Subcommittee New York University, Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine Research Interest The propagation of our species requires specialized cells called germ cells. Germ cells are set aside early in embryonic development and give rise to the eggs and sperm needed to produce the next generation. From early embryogenesis through adulthood, germ cells must undergo a diverse, coordinated, and incredibly conserved...


This post is part of the Early Career Scientist Policy Subcommittee’s series on science policy fellowships. Research!America sponsors a 3– 6-month science policy fellowship for recent PhD graduates. The Research!America alliance is made up of over 400 science organizations: from research institutions like Johns Hopkins to scientific societies like GSA to drug development companies like Merck. Based in Crystal City, Va, this fellowship focuses on biomedical and health services research, while giving fellows the opportunity to monitor policy issues, partake in self-directed projects related to science policy, and gain first-hand experience in policy-making by attending briefings on Capitol Hill. I sat...


New genetic data help explain the rapid adaptation of stickleback fish that invaded freshwater habitats in the 1960s. In 1964, an earthquake shook the islands off the coast of Alaska, transforming the landscape as underwater terraces were thrust above the surface. From this cataclysmic event emerged a series of freshwater pools that became a natural laboratory in which to study evolution in action. A new report in GENETICS takes a closer look at how this sudden environmental shift influenced the adaptation of one particular inhabitant. On the Alaskan islands, the newly-formed freshwater ponds were colonized by interlopers from the sea:...


Sujal Phadke is a staff scientist and evolutionary biologist at the J. Craig Venter Institute who finds not-for-profit research a supportive environment for early career investigators. In the Decoding Life series, we talk to geneticists with diverse career paths, tracing the many directions possible after research training. This series is brought to you by the GSA Early Career Scientist Career Development Subcommittee. Sujal Phadke completed her undergraduate studies in India before coming to the US and obtaining a PhD in ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Houston. She completed two postdocs (one at Duke University and the other at the University...