Richard Lewontin is the winner of the 2017 Morgan Medal.

We are pleased to announce that Richard C. Lewontin, PhD is the 2017 recipient of the Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal for lifetime achievement in the field of genetics. This award recognizes Lewontin’s extensive impact on our understanding of evolution, a broad and deep influence that has shaped the field. An unprecedented 160 distinguished biologists co-signed a letter of support to nominate Lewontin for the Morgan Medal. Lewontin is the Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology in the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Emeritus and a Professor of Biology Emeritus in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University. “While Richard Lewontin’s...


"Sky Dome" by Flickr user Eric B. Walker. Used under a CC BY-NC 2.0 License.

We have heard an outpouring of anger and fear from our members since the President’s budget proposal was released on March 16th. As GSA President Lynn Cooley and Vice-President Jeannie Lee argued last week, the proposed gutting of federal research budgets would be terrible for science—and worse for society. But this is just a proposal. Congress ultimately decides the fate of the budget, and you can make a difference. Here are nine quick ideas for how to advocate for science funding without needing to leave town, quit your job, or run for office: Call your senators and representatives. Find the...


By National Park Service [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

One of the last places you’d expect to find a charged amino acid residue is buried within the hydrophobic interior of a lipid bilayer. And for the most part, this expectation holds true: portions of proteins that span membranes are typically composed of hydrophobic residues. But in some cases, the positively charged residues lysine and arginine find their way into such apparently unfavorable positions, and it remains unclear why they haven’t been selected out of existence. One hypothesis to explain why such positively charged residues don’t always interfere with a membrane-anchoring domain of a protein’s function is that they “snorkel”....


Jonathan Hodgkin is the winner of the 2017 Novitski Prize.

We are pleased to announce that Jonathan Hodgkin, PhD is the 2017 recipient of the Edward Novitski Prize in recognition of his extraordinary creativity and intellectual ingenuity in solving significant problems in genetics research. Hodgkin uncovered the sex determination pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans, an important and widely used model for animal development and genetics. His innovations and contributions to genetic analysis, including the use of suppressor screens and epistasis analyses, helped advance the field in many ways. Hodgkin is a Professor in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Oxford. “Jonathan Hodgkin is a major innovator in C. elegans...


Nayak

We're taking time over the following weeks to get to know the members of the GSA's Early Career Scientist Steering Committee. Join us every week to learn more about our early career scientist advocates. Sumeet Nayak Communication & Outreach Subcommittee Co-Chair University of Massachusetts Medical School Research Interest: My research interest lies in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate the survival of cancer cells. I am working to define the roles hereditary breast cancer genes play when normal cells experience stress—and how this affects cancer progression. As a PhD-trained scientist, you have many career options. What career paths...