Why are scientists so interested in the health of seemingly insignificant creepy crawlies, vermin, microscopic blobs, and spindly weeds? This question is considered in a guest post up today on the March for Science blog by GSA Communications Director Cristy Gelling and University of California, Berkeley grad student Nicole Haloupek. Artist and Sanger Institute postdoc Alex Cagan has also created a stunning graphic to complement the post. Check it out and learn more about the basic research that fuels innovation! We hope you will join us tomorrow in marching for science. Please share your pictures of the march (and your preparations) using the...


We’re taking time over the following weeks to get to know the members of the GSA’s Early Career Scientist Committees. Join us every week to learn more about our early career scientist advocates. Elaine Welch Career Development Subcommittee Liaison University of Wisconsin-Madison Research Interest: I study vertebrate embryo patterning using the zebrafish as a model. My project aims at understanding the establishment of the primary vertebrate embryo axis and how the microtubule cytoskeleton is implicated in mediating the transport of maternal factors within the early zygote, a process necessary for dorsal axis formation. I have also been examining how microtubules...


Three weeks into my term as GSA’s President I went to the Women's March in New York with my daughters. The experience was energizing and uplifting on many levels—it was completely peaceful, attended by women and men of all ages, and focused entirely on affirming civil rights. The magic of the day came from the surprisingly massive participation around the world and the realization that people with all kinds of backgrounds and beliefs can be roused to action in the face of threats to basic civil liberties. As for many, many people, this was my first march, and it brought...


By amayaeguizabal via Pixabay.

Take two neighboring cells from the same tissue—cells that are about as identical as any could be. Despite their similarities, these two cells could actually vary massively in their transcriptome. The typical fate of an mRNA—the “transcript” in transcriptome—is to serve as a template to make a protein, but it isn’t clear that the differences in mRNA levels directly translate into differences in protein levels—or functional consequences. In the March issue of G3, Zhang et al. present evidence that Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), a signaling protein crucial for proper limb development, exhibits marked variance for the first 10 hours of limb...


We’re taking time over the following weeks to get to know the members of the GSA’s Early Career Scientist Committees. Join us every week to learn more about our early career scientist advocates. Adam J. Ramsey Liaison Communication and Outreach Subcommittee University of Memphis Research Interest: I study mitochondria, which are very small organelles inside all of our cells. They contain their own genomes and are responsible for making the ATP that fuels everything we do. It is usually assumed (and taught in genetics class) that mitochondria are inherited from one parent. This has given rise to the so-called “Mitochondrial...