Let’s bid farewell to 2016 with a look back at some of your favorite Genes to Genomes post from the year—plus a few more we think you’ll like:

Five most popular posts of 2016

Dear Mr. Trump

GSA President Stan Fields advises US President-elect Donald Trump to surprise the world and make science the cornerstone of his administration.

whitehouse-550

How to write titles that tempt

The title of a paper shouldn’t be a mini-abstract that gives away the ending, says GENETICS Editor-in-Chief Mark Johnston.

Nettie Stevens: Sex chromosomes and sexism

Who was the “Miss Stevens” cited by Calvin Bridges 100 years ago in the first article of the first issue of GENETICS?

Happy 150th to a fruit fly wrangler who changed the world

Drosophila was not an obvious first choice as the instrument of TH Morgan’s genetics revolution.

Art by Alex Cagan, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Art by Alex Cagan, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Kimura & Crow: Infinite alleles

In 1953, Jim Crow helped a lost graduate student find his way at a conference. Crow would later say this chance encounter changed both of their lives.

Editors’ picks

Memories of Sue Lindquist

A moving and personal tribute from Christine Queitsch to her long-time mentor and close friend Susan Lindquist.

Can gene drives survive in the wild?

Geneticists are racing to understand how gene drives might work—and how they might fail—in the wild.

The genetic history of horses

Compare a racing thoroughbred with a draft horse like a Clydesdale—they’re extremely different animals, but they both descend from the same ancestral group of wild horses.

Photo courtesy of Ludovic Orlando. Przewalski’s horses went extinct in the wild in 1969, but have since been reintroduced to Mongolia.

Photo courtesy of Ludovic Orlando. Przewalski’s horses went extinct in the wild in 1969 but have since been reintroduced to Mongolia.

Steering the biomedical workforce away from the iceberg

It’s clear that not enough traditional faculty jobs exist for the number of new PhDs—by a huge margin.

Something in common

GSA President Stan Fields is working on an explanation of evolution that some evolution doubters may be willing to consider.

Luria & Delbrück: Jackpots and epiphanies

In 1943, Salvador Luria and Max Delbrück published an article in GENETICS that marked the birth of bacterial genetics, revealing that apparently Lamarckian inheritance was in fact a case of random mutation.

Luria and Delbruck

Max Delbrück (left) and Salvador Luria (right) at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in 1953. Courtesy of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Archives.

 

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